IT@NJMS

Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on April 27th, 2018 by tssadmin

The REServation system is a web based application developed in house for room and event scheduling. The website is located at https://res.njms.rutgers.edu

After signing in, click on the Room Selection tab to search for the rooms that you want to view their schedule, or if you are looking to reserve a room, meet the requirements for your class, event, meeting, training session, etc.

You can search by building name, room name, room type, or room accessory. Each room will have their location, description, room type and capacity displayed in the search result. Select the room(s) you have in mind by clicking on the check boxes in the list, then go to the Scheduler tab, where you will see the current room usage and availability for the room(s) you have selected.

The default view is daily. You can either click through each day or jump to a weekly or monthly view. If you are looking to reserve a room, from the daily view, select an available time slot that you have in mind by clicking on a open time slot (white horizontal line).

A form is going to pop up asking for more detailed information on your event. Once the form is submitted, an email will be generated automatically and sent to the room manager(s) for the room that you requested. Your request will be considered as pending, shown in the calendar as yellow, until it has been approved by the room manager(s), then the event will be shown in green. You will also receive an email once your request has been approved.

The system has a mechanism built in to prevent booking conflicts as well as support for recurring events. Please log in and give it a try if you have not already.

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

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Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on March 28th, 2018 by tssadmin

Today’s Tech Tuesday is from Trevor St. Hill. Trevor joined IT@NJMS in 2006 (he has been part of UMDNJ/Rutgers since 2000) as a member of our Audio Visual Center (AVC). He brings to us his expertise in acoustic, visual and recording equipment, and has a particular interest in photography. Today he is going to share with you some information on microphones.

 

PROPER LABEL MICROPHONE PLACEMENT

Proper placement of the lavalier microphone is not that difficult, just follow these simple suggestions. A good technique for lavalier microphone placement for speaking is to place the lavalier between the chest and neck area. The closer it is to the neck the louder the sound pressure resulting in greater sound volume output.

In addition, lavalier microphones come with a battery body pack. It is a good idea to have a jacket, or a white coat, or pants pockets to place the battery body pack while speaking. The pack can also hook to an article of closing.

 

For related information on this topic:

The Audio Visual Center in B502, located in the lobby of the MSB by the escalators, can also provide headsets and handheld microphones for speaking engagements. You can borrow these as well for creating podcasts in your office that can then be posted on the internal video server and linked to a course page or website.

In addition, the AVC has a green screen that can be used for creating additional visual effects.

 

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

 

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Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on March 26th, 2018 by tssadmin

Today’s Tech Tuesday is from Barry Wise. Barry has been with IT@NJMS since 2003. He is part of the User Services group, and has been involved most recently in various large scale projects – including the Epic migration, the O365 migration, and the Windows XP upgrade – and has expertise in computer software, hardware, and networking. Today he is going to share with you some information about Microsoft Teams and Planner, two recent functionalities added to Rutgers Connect / Office 365.

 

I am pleased to present to you, two extremely useful components of our Rutgers Connect / Office 365 rollout, Microsoft Teams and Planner. I think you will find these tools extremely helpful communicating and collaborating with coworkers.

 

You are invited and encouraged to start using these features right away. If you would like to get started using these tools, you need only place a heat ticket with the helpdesk by emailing isthelp@rbhs.rutgers.edu or by calling 3-3200. We will get you setup right away.

 

Microsoft Teams:

With Microsoft Teams on your PC, Mac, or mobile device, you can:

  • Pull together a team.
  • Use chat instead of email.
  • Securely edit files at the same time.
  • Connect with team members through Skype
  • Customize it by adding notes, web sites, and apps.

Click on the link for a brief introduction to the Microsoft Teams Application.

 

Microsoft Planner:

  • Take the chaos out of teamwork and get more done! Planner makes it easy for your team to create new plans, organize and assign tasks, share files, chat about what you’re working on, and get updates on progress.

Click on the link for a brief introduction to the Microsoft Planner Application

 

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

 

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Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on March 26th, 2018 by tssadmin

Today’s Tech Tuesday is from Elaine Hughes. Elaine works in our User Services group providing hardware and software support to the community. She joined IT@NJMS in 2003 and is also a graduate of Rutgers University. She has 25 years of experience and expertise in computers and networking. Where Kenton provided you information on Cloud Backup Options, Elaine is going to share with you some information on local backup options.

 

Data Backup

Wherever I go people are always asking me for advice regarding their computers such as what make or model to buy or how much memory or what type of warranty to get. Every time I get asked these questions my answer is always the same. I tell them that the most important thing is not what you buy but to always make sure you have a good backup system.

I have found that in most cases people neglect to back up their data. I have worked in this field for twenty-five years and over the course of that time I have lost count as to how many times I had to deliver the bad news that data had been lost due to a hardware failure of one kind or another.

In some cases it is possible to recover lost data but most times this process can be very costly and the companies that do this will charge a large fee for “attempted” data recovery whether they are able to get your data back or not.

There are many options when it comes to data backup and each one has positives and negatives about them.  Here are three types of backup options that I personally recommend.

 

External Hard Drive Backup System:

There are many external hard drives to choose from but the one that I use and recommend is a Western Digital “My Passport.” It is a light weight compact external hard drive that connects to a USB port on your computer. It comes in various drive sizes depending on your needs.  For example, you can pick up a 1TB size for about $50 at Best Buy.

Pros:

This drive comes with backup software for your PC that once you install it will do a continuous backup of your data. For Mac users, this is perfect for Time Machine backups too. The other nice thing about this drive is that it is a portable drive and easy to carry with you if needed.

Cons:

This is a hard drive and like any hard drive it is subject to fail without notice. You should never store data on this or any portable drive that you do not also have someplace else.

 

Network Drives:

Here at the Medical School you may have heard people refer to the H, J, K, R or S drives.  These letters refer to space on our own internal file servers. H: for Home, J: for department shares, K: for restricted shares, R: for research data storage, and S: for encrypted clinical / research data storage.

Pros:

Data stored on these drives are backed up on a daily basis which has come in handy when a user accidentally deletes a file or folder.  Data is easily shared.  On restricted drives you can be very specific about which users can access certain data.

Also, Researchers can get 100 GBs of data on either the R or S drive, while additional storage on these drives costs $50 per 100 GBs.

Cons:

You have to be directly connected to the Network to access these drives.  Space is limited on the Core servers (H, J, and K) which has been a challenge for some departments because they have no control over what users put on those drives so they can fill up very fast and sometimes the files are duplicated and some things should not be stored there at all such as personal pictures or home videos.

 

Internet Back Up or Cloud Backup:

See Kenton’s summary at: Cloud Backup Options

In conclusion, these are just a handful of the many options available to users to ensure that if data is lost it can be retrieved. Remember, the three most important things when it comes to data are backup, backup and backup!

 

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

 

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Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on March 20th, 2018 by tssadmin

Global Map

The global map is just one new feature that is being created as part of a new home page look and feel and can be accessed at : https://njms-web.njms.rutgers.edu/RobertPaula/MAP/Map-Template-html.html . In this prototype, we highlight the International Surgical Health Initiative (ISHI) co-founded by Dr. Sifri of the department of Surgery.

Other such initiatives that we will be highlighting can be found at : http://njms.rutgers.edu/education/odace/office_global_health/global_projects.cfm

However, we are looking for your assistance to help us populate the map. If you or anyone you know (faculty, staff, students) are doing some great things that you would like to be highlighted as part of the Global Map initiative, please reach out to us at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu and let us know. Thanks,

For related information on this topic, see:

The Global Health Initiative Map

https://globalhealth.rutgers.edu/where-we-work-project-map/

 

The ODACE Map for local initiatives within the Newark community

https://www.google.com/maps/d/viewer?mid=1_udbHsaUe9_geDGW4QDJLQv6c-M&ll=40.742962376869336%2C-74.24969644999999&z=13

 

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

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Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on March 8th, 2018 by tssadmin

Today’s Tech Tuesday Is from Stephanie White. Stephanie is a Application Support Specialist who joined the IT@NJMS team in 2015. She provides assistance to faculty and students on the various academic system tools used on the Education Portal, and provides one on one instructional services as needed. She recently attend a Rutgers and CDW-G sponsored event on Virtual Reality and is going to share with you some of the information she came across at that event below.

 

Virtual Reality

The Rutgers / CDW-G sponsored event: https://www.facebook.com/events/183335292261165/

As technology starts to mature, it has allowed certain physical procedures to now be done virtually. Medical schools have been inviting virtual reality programs into their lab to teach students certain procedures that are important and cannot be seen by just cutting open a cadaver. For example, a procedure known as cricothyrotomy—which involves making an incision into a specific area of the patient’s neck and inserting a plastic tube through a thin membrane into the trachea—requires accuracy and speed, and can be lifesaving if performed correctly, but deadly if not completed in a timely or proper fashion. Other life-saving skills including intubation, central line and intraosseous catheter placement also require practice and repetition in order to save lives. Which can all be done virtually and repeated multiple times as needed.  Virtual Reality or VR, can also open up a new world of possibilities to experience the tense, real world clinical situations which require rapid thinking and quick analysis for management of critically ill patients undergoing CPR.

 

For more information on this topic, see:

The HoloLens Project at Case Western

http://case.edu/hololens/

The Holographic Brain Project at UBC

https://youtu.be/ZGObeVMjsR0

The Virtual Anatomy Lab at UCSF

https://www.ucsf.edu/news/2017/09/408301/how-vr-revolutionizing-way-future-doctors-are-learning-about-our-bodies

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

 

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Today’s Tech Tuesday

Posted on February 21st, 2018 by tssadmin

Today’s Tech Tuesday is from Kenton Falana. Kenton had been providing IT consulting on campus since 2011 and joined IT@NJMS full time in 2017. He works in our User Services group providing hardware and software support to the community and specializes in desktop services and data migration. Today he is going to share with you some information about cloud backup options.

 

Cloud Backup Options

There are several types of data backup but today we will be focusing on Cloud Backup options. Cloud storage is a simple and scalable way to store, access, and share data over the Internet. Cloud storage delivers “anywhere, anytime” access to data via a web application or app. There are several Cloud Storage options available at NJMS.

OneDrive, which is available to all Rutgers employees, is a file-hosting service operated by Microsoft and it is HIPAA compliant. Files can be synced to a computer and accessed from a web browser or a mobile device as well as shared internally or publicly with specific people. This is a great way to prevent losing data should your computer develop a problem. Note, if you plan on editing and / or sharing files with multiple people, for example within a lab, it is recommended that you have a group created for the lab to prevent access problems should a person leave if the data is tied to a personal account. For more information, https://oit.rutgers.edu/connect/guides/onedrive-business

Google Drive, is available through your RU Scarlet mail account, but it is NOT HIPAA compliant, and no sensitive data should be stored there. https://oit.rutgers.edu/faq/what-google-drive

Box, is another externally hosted option that will be coming soon to Rutgers. It works similar to Dropbox. https://www.box.com/home

ownCloud, is a cloud based system that is hosted internally by IT@NJMS that is primarily available only to the NJMS. It also works similar to Dropbox in that you can store, sync, and share files both internally and externally. Access is available either through a downloadable client or app or through the web at https://owncloud.njms.rutgers.edu/index.php/login .

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

 

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The Education Portal

Posted on February 14th, 2018 by tssadmin

The Education Portal is a single sign-on website that provides a central location for various key academic systems such as SOCRATES, Education Management System (EMS), Clinical Experience Log (CEL), Virtual Microscopy, Video@NJMS and Moodle. The Education Portal was created by IT@NJMS specifically for the purpose of one-stop shopping that supports the Office of Education and the academic community: faculty, staff and students. Before launching the Education Portal in August 2017, the various systems were scattered and existed in different locations. Now residing under one umbrella, you can log into the EP using your Core login credentials given you have a current role (teacher, course director, student, etc.) in the academic systems.

Education Portal URL:  https://ep.njms.rutgers.edu/

 

 

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Today’s TechTuesday

Posted on February 6th, 2018 by tssadmin

Today’s TechTuesday is from Nelson Pared. Nelson joined IT@NJMS in 2005. He is part of our User Services group, providing Help Desk assistance to the NJMS community. He has expertise in hardware and software deployment, troubleshooting, and project management. His overall interest is in providing excellent customer service to each client. Today he is going to share with you some information about using Microsoft OneNote in the workplace.

 

Microsoft OneNote

Ever wondered what is Microsoft OneNote? OneNote is your very own digital notebook. Whether you have a million ideas, a million things to do, or a million things to remember, OneNote is the perfect app for capturing pretty much everything. The following snippet is from an article by Andy Small of LIfehack.com on how to use OneNote at work.

1. It’s a good productivity tool to get things done (GTD)

OneNote is very much an empty notebook with which you can implement GTD at work. Use folders, sections and subsections like you would use physical folders. Instead of printing out that email or webpage, simply print and hit “send to OneNote” in the drop down menu. You can then file the “printout” where you need to.

2. Shared notebooks mean instant and real time collaboration

Put the OneNote notebook file in a place where it can be accessed by the people who need it and setup it up to share. And as simple as that, you have an online version of a whiteboard. Use OneNote to manage projects among many people, or simply as a place to throw ideas around. If there is sensitive material you can password-protect some or all of the notebook so that only certain people can see it. In my day job we have a weekly report we have to file with our supervisors. We use a OneNote notebook to make our weekly report accessible to everyone in the division.

3. Take better notes in meetings

If you have a laptop as your work PC, bring your laptop to meetings and have OneNote open and ready to take notes. Use the tagging feature to flag important tasks or questions as they arise. When I was still attending college I used OneNote for my lecture notes. I was able to tag things to look up later or for items I had questions about. More than once I had fellow students come up to me and ask what app I was using to take notes. They were very surprised to learn the program was included in Microsoft Office.

 

OneNote is a great tool that is often overlooked when talking about how to be productive.

With OneNote, you can also:

  • Type notes or record audio at your laptop.
  • Sketch or write ideas on your tablet.
  • Add pictures from your phone.
  • Find notes instantly.
  • Freely move notes around the page.
  • Organize those pages into sections.
  • Keep your sections in one or more notebooks.
  • Switch devices and pick up right where you left off.
  • Share your notebooks with others so you can all view and contribute at the same time.

 

For more information on this, see:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6E3eC2HfQJ0

http://www.lifehack.org/articles/technology/5-ways-to-use-onenote-at-work.html

https://support.office.com/en-us/article/video-what-is-onenote-be6cc6cc-3ca7-4f46-8876-5000f013c563

https://www.pcworld.com/article/2686026/software-productivity/microsoft-onenote-for-beginners-everything-you-need-to-know.html

If you have any questions or need assistance on this topic or other IT matters, please contact IT@NJMS at njmsts@njms.rutgers.edu

 

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